Business

MBA Advisor: An MBA For The NBA

Who is the most recent star student at Harvard Business School? Try NBA celebrity Kyrie Irving. Sports Illustrated reports that the guard is getting involved in Harvard Business School’s “Crossover Into Business” program. The semester-long program is catered to professional sportsmen seeking to develop their business skills by dealing with MBA pupil mentors. While the program is catered to be flexible towards sportsmen’ schedules, participants are expected to analyze the incident research with their mentors every 2-3 weeks.

This year, participating athletes include former NFL tight end Martellus Bennett; NBA players Paul Millsap, Zaza Pachulia, and Spencer Dinwiddie;, and athletes from the WNBA, Major League Soccer, UFC, and the American Ballet Theater, according to Sports Illustrated. The program is taught by Harvard Business School teacher Anita Elberse, who is no amateur when it comes to dealing with big-name superstars.

“The target audience is mid- to-senior level professionals who work in the mass media or entertainment space – or wishing to produce a changeover into that space,” Elberse says. “Or, they could come from industries associated with or helping this industry – like advertising. Monday On, Elberse kicked from the “Crossover Into Business” program.

“So fun to welcome these amazing sportsmen to the Harvard family yesterday! ” Elberse wrote on Instagram. The George Washington University School of Business announced that enrollment slipped by nearly 17% since 2017. The Hatchet reviews the B-school projected a 19% development. That expectation fell brief However. According to information obtained with the Hatchet, roughly 500 students have enrolled in the b-school’s graduate program this year.

Out of the 17 graduate programs at GW, 13 have missed projected enrollment numbers for the fiscal season of 2018, according to The Hatchet. Within the last five years, the b-school’s overall enrollment in master’s programs has experienced a reliable decline, shedding by almost 16% since 2012, relating to GW’s enrollment data.

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The Global Master of Business Administration program experienced one of the best deficits, The Hatchet reviews. The program got likely to sign up 80 students for 2018, but only 50 students finished up in the course. Jason Shevrin, a GW spokesman, says the school is continually prioritizing its students and ensuring that it is prepared for changes ahead. “The business school will continually examine all its programs while it strives to align its offerings with the needs of its students and the demands of the marketplace,” Shevrin tells The Hatchet.

GW isn’t the only college experiencing enrollment troubles. Overall, the full-time MBA has met some turbulence in recent years. Enrollments to full-time programs in the US dropped almost 20% between 2006 and 2016, according to the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Experts say the work is one of the biggest competitors when it comes to the MBA.

With the development in america economy lately, MBA application quantity has reduced as a result. Today, GMAC estimates that 70% of potential students in North America are thinking about alternatives to business school to meeting their goals. “More employers say you don’t need an MBA,” Dawna Levenson, director of MIT Sloan admissions, tells P&Q.

To add to that, MBA tuition isn’t getting any cheaper. “The expense of a graduate business degree and the need to take on student debt have the largest potential impact and will be the most likely to divert applicants from the B-school pipeline,” GMAC reviews. Young Park, an assistant professor of information systems and technology management at GW, says the declining enrollment at GW isn’t surprising. The graduate surroundings, he says, has changed. “The overall program doesn’t work any more, so we have to make more advanced, more customized that shows the changing environment,” he tells The Hatchet.